Friday, December 11, 2009

Quick and Simple Hooded Tube Scarf

Burrr. It's getting pretty chilly. About time I got my act together and shared this fun hooded tube scarf that I've been meaning to post for over a month now!
Inspired by a ready made scarf from American Apparel, I set out to make my own and have found I like mine even better than any of the mass-market scarves I've recently seen.



It goes together incredibly fast and due to the material used it requires very little finishing. I plan to whip up at least three more as gifts. They are great for a last minute handmade treat and a few of my friends have already shown interest in receiving one.

Here's what's needed:
   1/2 yard of 54" or wider Sweatshirt material, interlock, bamboo knit or other stretch knit.
   coordinating thread
   fabric marker/chalk pencil
   rotary cutter, straight edge or acrylic ruler and mat
   any hoodie or coat hood to trace
   optional - scrap felt for flower embellishment

Here's how:

Lay out your fabric still folded at center seam, take care to smooth out any bumps or folds. Fold hood in half and lay ontop of fabric at selvage, with hood opening looking toward center fold. Use chalk or fabric marker to trace outer edge of hood. Remove coat hood or hoodie.





Next draw a straight line from bottom of hood line across to folded edge. Then freehand draw a curved line starting from the top of the hood continuing straight out to the folded edge. This line should become nearly perpendicular to the bottom line. The shape should be as pictured above.


Now using your rotary cutter and straight edge cut along bottom line. Then free hand cut along hood edge and top curve, slow and steady with out lifting your blade. Set this large piece aside. Next using your straight edge or acrylic ruler cut a 4"x 22" strip from the remaining fabric (see upper left portion in above photo).



Unfold large scarf piece, pin strip right-sides together along one rounded hood edge. Strip will be longer then hood edge, trim off extra. Sew with a 1/4" seam allowance. Trim seam to 1/8". I find I can get the cleanest cuts with knit fabric by laying it flat on mat  and trimming seam allowance with my rotary cutter rather then with scissors.




Now with right side facing pin center strip to opposite hood edge. Again, sew with a 1/4" seam allowance and trim to 1/8". Turn right sides out and Voila.
To wear first put on hood, twist once and wrap slack around to back. Wear with hood up or down.



For felt flower (same as the flower in our current header) simply cut out a five petaled flower and 2 green leaves from scrap felt. Get pdf of flower template here. Attach the three pieces by sewing a few cross stitches in the center of the flower with a contrasting color of floss. Attach a safety pin or a brooch back and pin onto scarf.

Though knit fabrics yield the quickest results, this scarf could be made from anything you like, as long as it's wide enough. It'd be supper cute in the new extra wide Anna Maria Dobby Dots or a wide wool, lined with a sweet voile print. To do this I would make two of the above scarfs, one from an exterior fabric and one from a lining. Then I would sew the two together with right sides facing using a 1/2" seam allowance, first along top curved edge. Then along the bottom edge leaving about 5 inches open. Turn right sides out through opening and close using a blind stitch or topstich around top and bottom edges.  And done!

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

beautiful! thanks for the great instructions : )

Kellie said...

Awesome! Thanks for the tut! :)

Beth said...

I made the long drive yesterday to finally check out the store. Lovely and such a great selection.

Anita Bowman said...

Hi Beth, It was lovely to meet you and your friend yesterday. Hope to see again soon. Anita

Kunklebaby said...

Really fun-cute pictures too! :D

Cristin said...

Oh how gorgeous is that! Well done! I've been meaning to play around with some knits... they're kind of scary but I guess I should just DO IT already! GREAT tutorial!

April Rhodes said...

Cristin (& everyone really) - I say go for it!
I love working with knits but I forgot to mention that I HIGHLY recommend a walking foot for your machine. It makes working with knits so much more enjoyable and yields much better results then trying to sew them without one. Mine coast about $60+ from a local dealer. At first I was surprised at the price but have found it to be worth every penny.

Also to EVERYONE - Thanks so much for all your lovely comments! I've had reservations about putting photos of myself on our blog, but it's hard to pin down other willing models especially during my toddler free time of day. But now I'm over it... thanks for all your kind comments and big thanks to my mom for pushing the button for me. :)

urban craft said...

thanks for this. I've seen these and wanted one, now I might actually be able to pull off making one!

Rin said...

Wow! It is pretty and practical piece. I must try to make it!

lulabelle said...

What a great idea April!!! That is adorable! Thanks for the tutorial.

Jennivie Wirries said...

Beginner sewer. Only made two other things before: a pillow case in a sewing class and a pair of pajama pants with friends. I made 1 and a half of these tonight (machine problems at my sewing night). Love it! Thanks for the pattern

Zeva said...

I realize this is an old post, but I still wanted to leave a comment. I need a shawl like hood and this was the first post that came up when I did my search. Great instructions, exactly what I was needed for my outfit for our Christmas program. What is extra great about this, is I can wear it again!

Creative Escapes said...

This is awesome! I can't wait to try my own.

Nichelle said...

Great idea! I attempted to make this scarf with two different knit fabrics and when I tried to turn it right side out it has a weird twist in it that I can't get out! Please help :(

Anonymous said...

Hey Nichelle, I have the same problem, have you managed to resolve yours?

Anonymous said...

Good advice, however I was a little confused because you used the word perpendicular, when in fact it was parallel. However once I got over that, it was quite easy to follow your instructions. Thanks :)

lindaloo said...

THIS IS SO FREAKING CUTE. I HAVE TO MAKE ONE FOR EVERYONE!!!!!
THANKS SO MUCH FOR THIS.

MammaNene said...

I know it's an old post but.... I love this scarf and I love the shirt you're wearing... I'd like to sew all the two things... any suggestion on how to draft the shirt?
Thank you,
Irene

Lolita Tabujara said...

I too am having issues with flipping this right side out. Can someone help with advice?

April Rhodes said...

Hello all! First I want to just be sure it was clear that the scarf was not lined, just one piece of knit.. the wrong side shows but that was acceptable to me. Second, there is an error in the forth photo (blue fabric with white righting) and I am posting a new one. where it says perpendicular I meant parallel :( so sorry! I do lnow my directions but I somehow missed that :( : :(
HOPE THIS HELPS!
April

April Rhodes said...

EEEKKK! I forgot about the idea I mentioned toward the bottom... in fact you must leave the whole bottom edge of the two unsewn, fold them inside about a 1/4"-1/2" pin and then edge/topstitch together.

Anonymous said...

this will be great made of a lighter fabric for summer winds or the beach will keep in my bag or glovebox thanks for the great idea
scornmom

pikabrat said...

Hi, there. I'm eager to try this. Would it work with fleece?

Ms. Russell said...

pikabrat:I just made one made of fleece but I made it as a scarf rather than a cowl. I wanted it out of fleece as well but fleece is bulkier and I was afraid the cowl would be too bulky. So, I simply lengthen it a little and didn't cut it on the fold. This allows me to wrap one end around my neck to keep it warm. I also left out the strip along the hood. I cut the hood larger than the hoodie that I traced and made a seam along the middle of the hood and tapered the seam off at the base/neck to create the scarf. I hope this helps.

Pamela Stokes said...

This pattern is the same for hiljabs that I wear from Yeman. Now I can make my own. Thanks for sharing.